Publishing Details

Publication Type: 
Book Chapter
Authored by:
Kalyebara, Robert; Wood, Stanley; Abodi, Pamela Nahamya
Edited by: 
Smale, Melina; Tushemereirwe, Wilberforce K.
Publisher: 
International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
Publication Year: 
2007
Book Title: 
An Economic Assessment of Banana Genetic Improvement and Innovation in the Lake Victoria Region of Uganda and Tanzania
Page Range: 
141-153
ISBN: 
0-89629-164-2
Publication Place: 
Washington, DC

Abstract

In this chapter, an economic surplus approach is applied to assess the potential impact of a range of current and emerging technologies. Specialists and experts guided the definition of 6 banana production systems, determined according to productivity potential and the commercial orientation of growers, and 14 technology scenarios that span current best practices for managing bananas, genetic transformation, and conventional breeding. Simulations indicate that current recommended scenarios could generate the highest levels of gross benefits, assuming relatively high rates of adoption. Transgenic varieties resistant to major pests and diseases currently affecting banana production in Uganda appear to generate greater potential benefits than do conventional technologies. In part, this finding reflects expectations that gene insertion is more effective at combating specific pests and diseases. Time lags associated with R&D are also expected to be even longer for conventional banana improvement than for genetic transformation, given the plant’s sterility.

Citation

Kalyebara, Robert; Wood, Stanley; Abodi, Pamela Nahamya (2007) "Assessing the Potential Impact of Selected Technologies on the Banana Industry in Uganda," An Economic Assessment of Banana Genetic Improvement and Innovation in the Lake Victoria Region of Uganda and Tanzania, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Additional Attributes

Primary Contact: Stanley Wood
Geographic Coverage: Uganda, East & Central Africa
Keywords: Africa, Banana / Plantain, Banana Industry, Crop Improvement, Crops, East & Central Africa, Genetically Modified Crops, Impact Assessment, Technology, Uganda