Apr 30, 2015 by Melanie Bacou

HarvestChoice releases over 500 newly-updated indicators for Africa South of the Sahara at 10 km resolution.

HarvestChoice data release r2.5

May 13, 2013 by Phil Pardey

The Collaborative Masters of Agricultural and Applied Economics (CMAAE) program brings together students from 7 African universities. As part of this program, the University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics is offering a course on the economics of science and technology policy joint with the Department of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural Development at the University of Pretoria, South Africa.

L-R: Liebenberg, Beddow, UP Dept. Head Johann Kirsten, and Pardey

Sep 30, 2011 by Stanley Wood

Just wrapped up three days in Nairobi with our colleagues at the Regional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System (ReSAKSS), pulling together agricultural production and research experts from around East and Central Africa to share our tools and learn how we can make our data products work better for them.

HarvestChoice and ReSAKSS workshop 2011

Aug 4, 2010 by Jawoo Koo

Farming entails a great deal of choices and uncertainties. From season to season, weather varies, price fluctuates, soil degrades, pest damages, and climate changes. Farmers everywhere must cope with these uncertainties. Throughout the history of agriculture, many options have been developed to help manage these risks, increase yields, increase efficiency, and, more recently, promote the sustainability of the overall system.

Last month I was honored to visit Stanford as a featured speaker at their Global Food Policy and Food Security Symposium Series. I shared the bill with Prabhu Pingali, Deputy Director for Agriculture Development at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, who has been critical to helping guide and advance our work at HarvestChoice.

Recent spikes in global food prices have garnered much attention, as they did when prices spiked in the early 1970s. But much less policy attention has been placed on the longer-run trends in commodity prices.

Federal and state investments in agricultural research have consistently generated very high social rates of return. Surveys of the hundreds of studies quantifying the returns from agricultural research suggest rates of return in the range of 40–60 percent per year. Our recent work reconfirms that US public investment in agricultural research and development (R&D) has paid off handsomely, with benefit-cost ratios of 20:1 and higher. Nevertheless, for many reasons funding for research targeted at agricultural productivity has stagnated since the early 1980s.