May 14, 2012 by Cindy Cox

Fueled by a commitment to help society, agriculture is on Esri's mind. In fact, the World Bank asked them to write about it for FARMD: The Forum for Agricultural Risk Management in Development. And what did Esri –The global leader in Geographic Information System (GIS) software and geodatabase management applications – write about? HarvestChoice!

Apr 17, 2012 by Jeff Horwich

Risk: we all know what that means, right? But why is it such a critical part of our HarvestChoice portfolio, what does it mean when you look through the lens of farming in Sub-Saharan Africa?

Mar 23, 2012 by Jeff Horwich

Jason Beddow of HarvestChoice and the University of Minnesota, along with Darren Kriticos of CSIRO, explain how HarvestChoice is revolutionizing the science of tracking -- and predicting -- the paths of devastating crop pests and diseases such as UG99.

Feb 21, 2012 by Jeff Horwich

Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and HarvestChoice are now working together to apply innovative, “bio-economic” approaches to improve the food security of poor people in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Together, our organizations will merge biological, environmental and economic tools to track global food pests and better target strategic investments to improve global food security. 

CSIRO and HarvestChoice

Oct 10, 2011 by Terry Hurley

The definition of risk used by the HarvestChoice project does not frame risk as inherently bad. After all, farmers and other individuals often voluntarily subject themselves to risks that can be avoided. That is, some individuals may view risk as undesirable, others may not care, while still others may view it as desirable. Individuals who find risk undesirable are commonly referred to as risk averse. Individuals who do not care are commonly referred to as risk neutral. Individuals who find risk desirable are often referred to as risk preferring, loving, or attracted.

Farmer with load on shoulders

Mar 21, 2011 by Jeff Horwich

We're not normally focused on this part of the world, but something like the Japanese tsunami tends to divert your attention.

Screen-capture from NHK World

Aug 5, 2010 by Jawoo Koo

Not only crop growth and yield, crop models can be also used to estimate potential damages from pest/disease through a predefined set of damage pathways, or coupling points.

Army worm damage on corn

Aug 4, 2010 by Jawoo Koo

Farming entails a great deal of choices and uncertainties. From season to season, weather varies, price fluctuates, soil degrades, pest damages, and climate changes. Farmers everywhere must cope with these uncertainties. Throughout the history of agriculture, many options have been developed to help manage these risks, increase yields, increase efficiency, and, more recently, promote the sustainability of the overall system.

Coming up in December, I'll be honored to give the keynote address at the Field Crops Rust Symposium in San Antonio. Crop rust – wheat stem rust, in particular – is a topic we’ve spent a lot of time with in recent years, and we’re making fresh progress (see this recent paper) toward mapping and understanding the threat both in Africa and here in the U.S.