Dec 31, 2014 by Jeffrey Dickinson

In the 21st century, many people have cell phones. This is true even in Tanzania, the focus of a recent IFPRI survey, where 35% of farm households report having mobile phones in 2007. Using technology, we can reach these farmers in a faster and less expensive way by sending surveys directly to their mobile phones.

Oct 6, 2014 by Jeffrey Dickinson

One of the things we are working on at HarvestChoice is the diffusion of agricultural technologies. A number of papers include maps that show how a technology moves across areas and we have also begun to construct similar maps for Tanzania using agricultural census data. By better visualizing the diffusion of technology throughout Tanzania, we hope that this will spark more conversation about what might be influencing farmer decisions in sub-Saharan Africa.

Mar 13, 2014 by Cindy Cox

This report pools together research from within IFPRI and HarvestChoice and considers a wide range of relevant food and production challenges such as identifying promising technologies that will do most to sustainably increase agriculture productivity under a changing climate.

Oct 7, 2013 by Naomie Sakana

HarvestChoice is bringing together user-friendly tools, analytical know-how, and layers of big data to tell the story of where in sub-Saharan Africa and inform investment decisions as part of the G-8 initiative, New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition.

Sep 30, 2011 by Stanley Wood

Just wrapped up three days in Nairobi with our colleagues at the Regional Strategic Analysis and Knowledge Support System (ReSAKSS), pulling together agricultural production and research experts from around East and Central Africa to share our tools and learn how we can make our data products work better for them.

HarvestChoice and ReSAKSS workshop 2011

Feb 12, 2011 by Jawoo Koo

"How to compile and run DSSAT v4.5 on Linux?" Good question.

Question

Federal and state investments in agricultural research have consistently generated very high social rates of return. Surveys of the hundreds of studies quantifying the returns from agricultural research suggest rates of return in the range of 40–60 percent per year. Our recent work reconfirms that US public investment in agricultural research and development (R&D) has paid off handsomely, with benefit-cost ratios of 20:1 and higher. Nevertheless, for many reasons funding for research targeted at agricultural productivity has stagnated since the early 1980s.