Dec 31, 2014 by Jeffrey Dickinson

In the 21st century, many people have cell phones. This is true even in Tanzania, the focus of a recent IFPRI survey, where 35% of farm households report having mobile phones in 2007. Using technology, we can reach these farmers in a faster and less expensive way by sending surveys directly to their mobile phones.

Sep 16, 2014 by Carlo Azzarri

HarvestChoice researchers explore the assumption that owning livestock leads to better nutrition and health outcomes for children and other household members in rural Uganda.

Jul 23, 2013 by Cindy Cox

Dr. Maction Komwa from George Mason University is a visiting scientist at HarvestChoice, IFPRI. The team recently sat down with Maction and discussed his research looking into labor constraints in African agriculture. The results are this blog post describing some of his findings and an upcoming inclusion in HarvestChoice’s flagship study on agricultural constraints in sub-Saharan Africa.

Aug 17, 2010 by Zhe Guo

This surface divides sub-Saharan Africa into market sheds by measuring the nearest city or ‘market’ with a population of 20,000; 50,000; 100,000; 250,000; and 500,000 respectively. Nearness is determined by measuring the least accumulated ‘cost’ or travel time to each market center. The market shed is the total area surrounding each market for which that market has the lowest cost in terms of travel time. Travel time was estimated based on the combination of different spatial data layers, or variables, which affect the time required to travel across to the given points (i.e. cities). Market shed data can be used to determine the number of people or households that are more than likely dependent on a given market center (assuming that most people would travel to the closest market for their needs).

Aug 15, 2010 by Melanie Bacou

HarvestChoice relies heavily on large sets of household survey data to evaluate the economic impact of biophysical productivity responses at the farm level and on target populations.

Household Attributes (Credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dadakim/1346547512/)