Nov 17, 2014 by Carlo Azzarri

How does a potentially devastating disturbance, such as drought or excess rainfall, effect the ripples of trade flow in sub-Saharan Africa? What is the spatial relationship between biophysical characteristics and net exports in a particular country or region? What do historical patterns and spatial variability in the environment, agricultural production, and natural shocks tell us about food distribution and possible mitigation through responsive trade flows? HarvestChoice explores these questions in a recently published chapter included in the flagship publication, ReSAKSS Annual Trends and Outlook Report (ATOR) 2013.

Nov 3, 2014 by Jawoo Koo

"... (A) grand African paradox was beginning to form in Kenya: food shortages and surpluses side by side, simultaneous feast and famine. Drought was spreading in the northern and eastern reaches of Kenya, threatening herders and their livestock. The government declared a food shortage in the country and said it would be necessary to import food, either by purchasing from neighboring countries or inviting food aid, to feed the growing ranks of the hungry. ... At the same time, farmers in the breadbasket regions of western Kenya and the Rift Valley were complaining about the low prices they were receiving for their maize."