Jul 31, 2014 by Maria Comanescu - 0 comments

Each year Esri brings people together from all over the world who share a common interest - to make the world a better place through maps. This year’s Esri User Conference gathered over 16,000 participants in San Diego, California, including 14 representatives from the CGIAR Consortium for Spatial Information (CGIAR-CSI) and HarvestChoice. Participants shared their stories of where with the help of technological innovation in digital mapping, big data, remote sensing, and GIS.

Jul 31, 2014 by Maria Comanescu - 0 comments

Each year Esri brings people together from all over the world who share a common interest - to make the world a better place through maps. This year’s Esri User Conference gathered over 16,000 participants in San Diego, California, including 14 representatives from the CGIAR Consortium for Spatial Information (CGIAR-CSI) and HarvestChoice. Participants shared their stories of where with the help of technological innovation in digital mapping, big data, remote sensing, and GIS.

Jul 22, 2014 by Ulrike Wood-Sichra - 0 comments

Until recently we at HarvestChoice had no idea that people live in NUTS. Within the European Union they have switched from administrative entities as the unit of statistical reporting for each country to sub-divisions, or what they call NUTS. What does this have to do with HarvestChoice? SPAM 2005, one of its flagship products, needs to know the statistical reporting unit in each country for accurate spatial allocation of crop production around the globe.

Jul 18, 2014 by Melanie Bacou - 0 comments

As proponents of the open data movement, HarvestChoice works to provide harmonized, spatially referenced biophysical and socio-economic data layers for sub-Saharan Africa. To complement our landscape scale database, HarvestChoice is also leading the effort to capture and geocode the activities of CGIAR centers and sub-regional organizations around the globe.

Jul 17, 2014 by Ulrike Wood-Sichra - 0 comments

Characterizing global production systems just got easier. IFPRI/HarvestChoice has updated SPAM, from circa 2000 to centering on the year 2005. That’s right; SPAM 2005 is out for release and freely available to the public. That means more accurate and up-to-date spatially disaggregated crop production statistics and more of it.

Jul 16, 2014 by Ulrike Wood-Sichra - 0 comments

Capturing the heterogeneity of VoP (Value of Production) across sub-Saharan Africa in a spatially explicit way is another example of what we do at HarvestChoice. Because informed decision making in agricultural development doesn't just rely on knowledge of important indicators, but a geographical context of where.

Mar 13, 2014 by Cindy Cox - 0 comments

This report pools together research from within IFPRI and HarvestChoice and considers a wide range of relevant food and production challenges such as identifying promising technologies that will do most to sustainably increase agriculture productivity under a changing climate.

Oct 7, 2013 by Naomie Sakana - 0 comments

HarvestChoice is bringing together user-friendly tools, analytical know-how, and layers of big data to tell the story of where in sub-Saharan Africa and inform investment decisions as part of the G-8 initiative, New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition.

Sep 27, 2013 by Joe (Zhe) Guo - 0 comments

Photo credit: IFPRI

To every crop there is a season with optimal times for planting, sowing, and harvesting. Precisely documenting these times in a Crop Calendar through time and space, however, remains a challenge, particularly at small scales such as the pixel. But pixels are what HarvestChoice is all about.

Aug 15, 2013 by Ulrike Wood-Sichra - 0 comments

It may get stuck in your junk folder, confused with a tin of mysterious food, or buried in a Google search (try adding a few more key terms), but for now the name sticks (and sticks in your memory); SPAM (Spatial Production Allocation Model) is not getting a new name anytime soon. That’s just one of the items key players discussed at a recent SPAM workshop.

Jul 23, 2013 by Cindy Cox - 0 comments

Dr. Maction Komwa from George Mason University is a visiting scientist at HarvestChoice, IFPRI. The team recently sat down with Maction and discussed his research looking into labor constraints in African agriculture. The results are this blog post describing some of his findings and an upcoming inclusion in HarvestChoice’s flagship study on agricultural constraints in sub-Saharan Africa.

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